I continue to passionately support the statement that “food is medicine.” Scientifically, the impact of food and natural substances on our bodies is much greater than we have been led to believe. Solid scientific studies and research back up this claim (even when “modern” medicine ignores it), so it’s important to know what science really says about nutrients like forskolin, especially when the results we’re shown are so incredible.

Blood sugar maintenance. There’s one study that points to the possible use of Forskolin to control blood sugar levels. In the study, the supplement was administered for eight weeks and resulted in decreased fasting blood glucose levels. For anyone who has an understanding of the relationship between pre-diabetes, diabetes, and weight, this revelation may lead to another understanding of how Forskolin may help with weight loss. Many pre-diabetic patients struggle to lose weight due to insulin resistance. If Forskolin can help maintain normal blood sugar levels, individuals with insulin resistance may avoid sugar highs and crashes in a cycle that encourages more weight gain. Some supplements such as GOLO are based on this premise and have been used with great success. Forskolin may be another viable option for those on the path towards pre-diabetes to control blood sugar and lose weight.


Because of the way it lowers blood pressure, those with low blood pressure already should avoid taking forskolin. Anyone currently taking beta blockers or nitrates for chest pain should also steer clear of taking this supplement. People who are pregnant, nursing, have blood disorders, are about to have or just had surgery (within two weeks), or are suffering from heart disease should not take forskolin.


Though we often associate turmeric with spicy foods, it has actually been used to treat inflammatory bowel conditions like colitis. Try it in a gut-soothing soup using organic chicken bone broth as the base. Turmeric also happens to be a low-FODMAP food, so it's safe to use if you’re on a FODMAPs elimination diet. It pairs well with pureed kabocha or pumpkin, which are also low-FODMAP.


Use of curcumin resin from tumeric as a drug is limited because it is not effectively absorbed by mouth. Turmeric itself is used as a spice in curry powders and mustard. It is marketed with claims of potent antioxidant activity, improving bone and joint health, and reducing inflammation, but clinical trials are limited. Its effectiveness in treating some cancers has been investigated.
More recently, it’s played an important role in scientific research because of its ability to activate cAMP accumulation. (15) What does that mean, exactly? Well, cAMP (also known as cyclic adenosine monophosphate or cyclic amp) is a “second messenger” that impacts various biological processes. These second messengers are responsible for helping your cells understand how to process the messages of various “first messengers,” like epinephrine or serotonin. The first messengers begin cellular processes, and then second messengers act as translators in cellular processes within your body.

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In the UK, up to 5% of the general population is underweight, but more than 10% of those with lung or gastrointestinal diseases and who have recently had surgery.[29] According to data in the UK using the Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool ('MUST'), which incorporates unintentional weight loss, more than 10% of the population over the age of 65 is at risk of malnutrition.[29] A high proportion (10-60%) of hospital patients are also at risk, along with a similar proportion in care homes.[29]
During the surgery doctors removed liver tissue and they then then measured the levels of curcumin in the tissue. The results showed that the level of curcumin absorbed into the liver was not high enough to have any anticancer effect. The researchers suggested that future clinical trials of curcumin should focus on preventing bowel tumours. Several studies have shown that curcumin taken as capsules does get absorbed by the gut and is present in the blood. But the amount in the blood is small. <
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